Originally posted on iRevolutions:

To say that Indonesia’s capital is prone to flooding would be an understatement. Well over 40% of Jakarta is at or below sea level. Add to this a rapidly growing population of over 10 million and you have a recipe for recurring disasters. Increasing the resilience of the city’s residents to flooding is thus imperative. Resilience is the capacity of affected individuals to self-organize effectively, which requires timely decision-making based on accurate, actionable and real-time information. But Jakarta is also flooded with information during disasters. Indeed, the Indonesian capital is the world’s most active Twitter city.

JK1

So even if relevant, actionable information on rising flood levels could somehow be gleaned from millions of tweets in real-time, these reports could be inaccurate or completely false. Besides, only 3% of tweets on average are geo-located, which means any reliable evidence of flooding reported via Twitter is typically not actionable—that is, unless local residents and responders know where waters are rising, they can’t take tactical action in a timely manner. These…

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The paper “Network modelling for road-based Fecal Sludge Management“ has won the Institute of Civil Engineers’ James Hill Prize for best paper in Journal Municipal Engineer. As a result of the prize the paper will be made open access.

View the annoucement at http://www.icevirtuallibrary.com/info/awards2015 or read the previous post about the paper.

…the symposium brings together leading scholars, researchers, critics, and practitioners for a series of discussions about the consequences of big data, data-driven design, and their latent potentials for design, planning, and activism.

As forays into big data analytics support increasingly innovative design strategies, and as new theoretical approaches and policy frameworks shape the future of urban data politics, the symposium asks how, why, and for whom: Data Made Me Do It.

Accountabilities Panel Presentation
Hacking Twitter to build evidence based flood response in Jakarta

Slides from the Free and Open Source Software for Geospatial Conference, Portland September 2014.

Mapping urban infrastructure systems is a key requirement to advance our capacity to understand and promote the resilience of cities to both extreme weather events as a result of climate change and to long-term infrastructure transformation as a process of climate adaptation. Yet, while developing nations will bear the brunt of the interwoven, climatic, economic and social challenges of the 21st century, many of these countries lack the sensor networks required to monitor and model the response of the urban system to change.

The nexus of people and place embedded in social media communication which is widespread and ubiquitous in many developing nations offers one potential solution. In this context, location-based social media often in the form of big-data, can be used to map emerging spatio-temporal trends to support situational management. Critically, however, the collection and application of such data raises significant questions around privacy, trust and security of the information gathered. The

MapJakarta.org project will be presented as a demonstration of the capabilities of free and open source geospatial technology to employ real-time social media data in a secure and anonymous manner for the purpose of decision support.

[view complete abstract]

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